Death by Fork... Why can't we change our eating habits?


Why is it so difficult to steer ourselves away from foods we know are destructive when we know that the food we fuel our bodies with is directly correlated with our health and well-being? A large factor in that answer is habit.

Margaret Mead, an American cultural anthropologist who was popular in the 1960s and 1970s, may have said it best with, “It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change a man’s diet.” I’m assuming she meant this to be applied to women too.

What is it that makes us compelled to eat fast food rather than home-cooked meals?

Habit. Upbringing. Cultural norms.

These are incredibly powerful influences in our life decisions that take some serious consideration before attempting change.

As a healthcare provider, one of the hardest barriers to overcome is cultural norms. As our society becomes more comfortable with obesity despite its established health risks, it is harder and harder to convince people of the need to change.

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Death by Fork... Why can't we change our eating habits?